Maggie & Me : Coming Out and Coming of Age in 1980s Scotland by Damian Barr

Revisit the Thatcher years as seen from the eyes of a working class teenager from a smallMaggie & Me town near Glasgow.

In 1984, eight year old Damian views Margaret Thatcher’s televised iconic survival from a bombing on the first night he is living in a stranger’s apartment after his parents split up.

The stranger is his mother’s new boyfriend, who turns out to be highly abusive to Damian and his sister.  It doesn’t help that his mother soon has another child with her boyfriend, and shortly after is hospitalized with a brain hemorrhage.  When his mom comes back home, they eventually leave the abusive boyfriend, but the next living arrangement is far from ideal.

His father still has his children every other weekend, and Damian is remains close to his dad, even though the dad’s girlfriend is a piece of work and tends to dominate things when the kids visit.

Growing up with his peers is not easy.  Damien is always the tallest and geekiest in his class.  He also knows early on that he is gay, and gets a lot of flack from the other kids for it.  He also meets some lasting friends and understanding teachers, finds that he’s good at most academics (math excepted), and has a life amidst the squalor that makes up home.

Damien comes to terms with Margaret Thatcher in his own fashion, alternatively seeing her as enemy or motivator.  That’s one of the things I liked about the book.  He has his issues with Thatcher, being from a working class environment, but doesn’t completely vilify her.  As a slight nod to the Iron Lady, each chapter begins with a Thatcher quote to set the tone.

While Margaret Thatcher’s era is the framework for Maggie & Me, the story is all Damian’s, and he renders his teenage years vividly.

(William Hicks, Information Services)

 

 

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