The Saints of Rattlesnake Mountain by Don Waters

saints of rattlesnake mountainFaith and Catholicism are major themes in this group of stories largely set in the American Southwest, although I don’t think you have to be a Catholic to appreciate the writing.  The characters in this collection are not what I would call mainstream – Waters tells of prisoners, middle-aged surfers, terminally ill expats, and others, some on a search for meaning, and on occasion, on the run from reality.

In the title story, Emmett is a “trustee” – a prisoner who is allowed out of the cell block to do hazardous herding work, in this case corralling a group of wild Mustang horses.  The wide open-ness of his surroundings and his limited freedom bother Emmett almost as much as confinement and eventual taming bother the horses.  In “Day of the Dead,” our terminally ill protagonist heads to Ciudad Juarez for a suicide pact with a priest, and finds that he’s not quite ready to watch someone else die.  In “Full of Days,” an anti-abortionist in Las Vegas wants to save the word according to an inspired sign he’s created, but finds that successes aren’t ever guaranteed.  And in “Last Rites,” a poor kid finds salvation of a sort from skateboarding and altar boy duties with his well-off best friend.

And there’s much more.

None of the stories here are “easy”.  Death, risk, and occasionally disfigurement all play parts in Waters’ world of fiction.  I found it hard to find any of these a feel-good story.  What you will find in The Saints of Rattlesnake Mountain is lyrical writing about the underbelly of life in the Southwest – the author provides gritty but accessible voices to other worlds beyond the tourist havens and the casinos.

(William Hicks, Information Services)

 

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