The Life We Bury by Allan Eskens

the-life-we-buryJoe Talbert is a college student with more on his plate than most.  Besides working and classes, he has an autistic younger brother and an abusive alcoholic mother.  Joe lives a couple of hours from home, and periodically drives there to sort out troubles with his family.

Joe is having a hard time with an English assignment, in which he is to interview and write a biography about someone.  One of the places he considers for material is a nearby nursing home.  Most of the residents there suffer from dementia, but one recent one, a Vietnam veteran, appears to be an apt candidate.

Carl Iverson is getting older, but he isn’t in this nursing home for the age factor.  He’s been serving a lifetime prison sentence for the rape and murder of a fourteen year old girl in 1980, and has been paroled here, as he is dying of cancer.  Carl is still lucid, though, and once he warms up to Joe, there’s a long story to tell, with more to it than a convenient conviction and thirty years of jail time.

Joe gets into the case more than he should, with help from the young lady down the hall.  Lila is elusive at the beginning but makes friends with Joe’s brother Jeremy, who is staying temporarily at Joe’s apartment during an absence of their mother.  As the two delve into old court records and Joe talks to an old friend of Carl’s, they find startling truths about Carl and the reality of the case, and tread some dangerous territories.

The Life We Bury got good reviews when it came out a few years back.  I found it an enjoyable thriller, sort of written in young adult mode, but considering the main character, this seemed appropriate.  Joe is older than his years, but naive in some respects.  He does impulsive things, has anger issues (take his home life into perspective), and gets himself into very bad situations without thinking things through.  He also has a good heart and wants a future for both himself and his brother.

A cold case, family dysfunction, and a noble-meaning but flawed young hero – what more could you want to start out 2017?

The author has two newer books that have both gotten good reviews –  The Guise of Another and The Heavens May Fall.

(William Hicks, Information Services)

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: