Grandma Gatewood’s Walk : The Inspiring Story of the Woman Who Saved the Appalachian Trail by Ben Montgomery

grandmaEmma Gatewood lived a hard life.  She married a husband who proved to be abusive, had eleven children, and worked her fingers to the literal bone.  At the age of sixty-seven, she took a walk as “a lark” that ended over 2,000 miles later, becoming the first woman to walk the Appalachian Trail.

Gatewood started light with a pack she pieced together, carrying some bare necessities.  Along the course of her travels, she met plenty of “trail angels” who sheltered and fed her.  There were also times when people were inhospitable, she was eating wild berries for sustenance, used a shower curtain that she’d brought for rain protection, and stayed warm by heating rocks in a fire and sleeping on them after they’d warmed up enough.

Her journey was arduous, as are all along this trail, but Gatewood’s was particularly heinous.  1955 was a year of vicious hurricanes that flooded the northeast without mercy; Gatewood reached New England right when these storms hit.  There were rivers that were nigh impossible to cross.  Some she crossed alone, others with help.  One of the luckiest meetings she experienced was sharing a trail shelter with a Catholic mission group that included some of Harlem’s most notorious gang leaders.  Everyone involved realized a common need, and Gatewood got through some of her worst crossings by help from this group.

The press soon got wind of Gatewood’s “lark” and as she progressed, journalists of all kinds were at any town of size along her way, quick to get in a picture or story, and Grandma’s legend grew.  And yes, Katahdin was hers, hard-won but attainable.

Gatewood was just getting started…

Grandma Gatewood’s Walk is a nice mix of trek account, family background, and social commentary of the 1950s, when society was changing and people were becoming more sedentary due to the convenience of the automobile.  The news of an older lady walking in the middle of nowhere was a novelty, and a necessary jolt in the arm for the general public to remind them of the benefits of exercise and the great outdoors.

Gatewood’s comments on poor conditions of portions of the AT raised more awareness of the trail and its importance to hikers; in the following years, there were improvements to shelters and accessibility.

(William Hicks, Information Services)

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