The Treehouse : Eccentric Wisdom from My Father on How to Live, Love, and See by Naomi Wolf

treehouseA decrepit house in rural New York beckons the author as a place of rejuvenation.  Many visits and much labor later, the property becomes a retreat for others, including immediate family, friends, and Wolf’s father, whose life and ideals set the tone for this book.

Leonard Wolf has led a colorful life.  Born in Romania in the 1920s, he immigrated as a small child to the United States.  During the 1940s onward, he was prominent in the American Bohemian community on the west coast as a writer and teacher.  Wolf never amassed a fortune, but stayed true to his ideals.  He continued to teach and publish long after other movements (the Beats, the Hippies) made their mark.

The author discusses her father’s unconventional method of education and how her own teaching approach evolved during the stretch of time they were renovating the country house.  Her father comes to visit there from time to time, offering his help in painting and building a treehouse for Naomi’s daughter.  The treehouse evolves as well; near the book’s end, you’ll find the final result as something far different from what they had originally planned.

Visitors to the house find that Leonard and the property are catalysts for change in their own lives.  Several of Naomi’s friends and students come at troubled times; they find, if not answers, then other avenues for creative and personal growth.  And even the neighbor that Naomi hired for clearing out the overgrown yard explores his own creativity, far beyond what they hired him for, and the property and treehouse are much improved because of his work.

The Treehouse is a worthy read for anybody hitting a dead end with a creative endeavor, or going through a trying emotional time.  It ultimately recounts the reconnection of a daughter with her father, but there is much more to the book than that.

(William Hicks, Information Services)

 

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