Generation Me by Jean M. Twenge

Members of what Twenge, an associate professor of psychology, defines as “Generation Me” range from elementary school students through adults in their mid-thirties. These young people have been taught to have high self-esteem and to believe that anything is possible for them. They are open-minded and tolerant of others. Their self-confidence leads them to believe that they can command high salaries and fulfilling, exciting jobs at a young age. Personal happiness is more important to them than the call of duty, which motivated earlier generations. Often, as they face the challenges of a competitive working world and of exorbitant prices for housing and otherGeneration_me_2  necessities of life, they become cynical. It seems unlikely to them that the political process  can help them in their daily lives. They particularly find it difficult to juggle family and career in an age of high day care costs and long days at the office. This book will interest members of “Generation Me,” who may find that Twenge is describing them and their friends. It also will interest employers, colleagues, teachers, and parents of Generation Me individuals, as well as any of us who are interested in the trends in our society.

Despite the academic credentials of the author, the book is an easy, fascinating read.

(Helen Snow, Information Services)

Editor’s Note – Other books in the library collection that expound upon similar topics:

Strapped : why America’s 20- and 30-somethings can’t get ahead by Tamara Draut

A Working Stiff’s Manifesto:  A Memoir by Iain Levison

Letters from young activists : today’s rebels speak out

Millennials rising : the next great generation by Neil Howe and Bill Strauss

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